INTRODUCTION nursing programme as written by UCC, 2015 clearly

INTRODUCTION

Luckasson et al: AAIDD,2010, referred to intellectual
disability as” mental retardation which was later in 2010 termed as
intellectual disability, and is a disability characterised by significant
limitation both in intellectual functioning and adaptatively behaviour as
expressed in conceptional, social and practical adaptive skill; which originate
before age 18″.

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An Bord Attranais/Nursing and Midwifery brand of
Ireland NMBI in 2015, postulated that “the philosophy of care of a person with
an intellectual disability contains a number of implicit principles which
embrace it concept that all people with all levels of ability have the same
right and in so far as possible the same responsibility as other member of
society”.

Understanding of the word intellectual disability and
the philosophy of the care of ID person as stated above by An Bord Attranais.
In their article, Peter Lewis et al 2016, emphasised that “in the UK, people
with ID are 1-6 times more likely to be hospitalised than the general
population”. The hospital staff were said to be lacking the knowledge or skills
in how to care for and communicate with ID people which can lead to higher rate
of preventable readmission to hospital than experienced by the general
population, hence the need for Intellectual Disability Nurses. (Peter Lewis et
al, 2016).

The philosophy of the intellectual disability nursing
programme as written by UCC, 2015 clearly defined
intellectual client participation in the community, the development of socially
valued roles disability nursing as a profession that “strives to improve
client participation in the community, the development of socially valued roles
and increased personal satisfactory and fulfilled inclusive of the family”.

Intellectual disability Nurses are caring, productive,
reflective and analytical healthcare professionals, who will be an integral
member of the interdisciplinary teams drawing on their in-depth specialist
theoretical knowledge and clinical experience. (UCC,2015).

Owen Doody et al, 2017 gave the fact that “many
countries do not have specially trained intellectual disability nurses. Peter
Lewis et al, 2016 affirmed it saying “the only countries offering a unique
specialist qualification in Intellectual Disability Nursing are the UK and Ireland.

In this assignment I will be describing the role of
the intellectual disability nurse in undertaking person centre planning with
people with an intellectual disability.

 

THE ROLE OF THE INTELLECTUAL DISABILITY NURSE

Peter Lewis et al, 2016, emphasised that “Nurses need
to be adequately prepared to care for people with intellectual disability. He
further said the preparation should, “include dealing with the complexities of
communicating with people with intellectual disability and practical experience
of doing so in clinical and educational environment that ensure the safety and
dignity of nurses and people with ID.

The following role of
intellectual disability nurses as required by HSE Dublin mid leister, HSE
Dublin North East, HSE South and HSE West.

·        
Provide holistic, person centred nursing
care, promoting optimum independence, enhancing the quality of life for service
users with intellectual, physical or sensory disability in all aspects of daily
living.

·        
Assess, plan, implement and evaluate
individual service user’s person-centred care programme within an agreed
framework in accordance with best practice and grounded in recent
evidence-based nursing research.

·        
Develop and maintain close links with the
service user, family/guardian, ensuring a partnership approach.

·        
Work closely with the multidisciplinary
team to achieve optimal input for the service user.

·        
Maintain appropriate and accurate written
records and reports regarding service user care in accordance with local and
international guideline.

·        
Foster a philosophy of care that reflects
the HSE and local service commitment to quality, using an evidence-based
approach in a safe environment maintaining the dignity of the service user.

·        
Monitor overall healthcare, prevention of
illness and promote healthy life style with service users.

·        
Promote and maintain nursing standards of
person centre care, including the promotion of normalisation and quality of
life issue.

·        
Encourage service user’s engagement in
community activities and escort and participate in such activities thus
promoting a socially inclusive model of living.

·        
Contribute to, implement, monitor, and
review the development of risk assessment for service users.

(HSE,2012. Campaign reference NRS592)

 

According to Fintain K
Sheerin, 2008, intellectual disability nurse “act as an advocate for service
user and their families and provide information to empower them in decision
making, goal setting and problem solving in order to optimise their
contribution and facilitate their participation in community-based activities”,
affirmed by HSE, 2012, Campaign reference NRS592.

INMO, 2015, identified
the below bullet points as the role of IDN covering across four stages of
life’s;

·        
The key role of IDN begin upon diagnosis,
whether this be earlier or later in a person life and help in linking the key
transition period to each stage of life progressing into the twilight year.

·        
Support client and family to develop their
own solution, overtime, that build on the strength and capabilities of
intellectual disable people.

·        
Liaise with other professionals in the
health service for example maternity and paediatric hospital, primary care and palliative
care service as well as with other agency to priotise the needs of their clients.

·        
Lead out on the provision of
community-based services ensuring families are involved in their service
delivery thus ensuring family centred practice.

·        
Provide support across all environment,
house setting (residential), educational (special school) and community setting
(after school).

·        
Provide training to families in defined
core areas including, Early Bird Plus (autism training), Lamh, challenge
behaviour etc.

 

PERSON CENTRED PLANNING
WITH INTELLECTUAL DISABILITY PEOPLE

It was reported by
Michael et al, 2015 that “the concept of person centred care is strongly linked
to Kitwoods works of 1997 in relation to dementia care, which emphasises a
belief that all people can lead fulfilled lives”

US Military July, 2017 in
EP magazine defined, person- centre planning “as a process which helps
individual with disabilities direct their lives with the involvement of their
families, and now have more options to plan housing, work, finance and more”.

People with intellectual
disability have been experiencing transformation in the way service is been
provided to them, progressively shifting from a system centre approach to a
person-centred approach, tailored around the client, instead of one size fits
all structure. (V.Ratti et al, 2015).

 V.Ratti et al, 2015, explained further that
“person- centre planning is the latest approach aimed at achieving
individualized support for people with intellectual disability and improving
their quality of life.

 Approaches may differ in their practical
application according to the content and purpose for which they are adopted but
the underlying aim is the same and the common denominator between the
variations of person-centre planning is to support people with intellectual
disability to build a lifestyle based on choice, preference, right and
inclusion. (V.Ratti et al,2015)

Person-centre care is
very effective, not only among patient with chronic physical and mental health
condition but also effective in improving both treatment and patient outcome
and is cost effective. (Kwan & Sandercook, 2003).

In contrast, Michael
Brown et al, 2015, identify some barriers in the application of this type of
care such as time, dissolution of professional power, limited autonomy to
practice, limited organisation structure, poor care environment, lack of
understanding of person-centre care as applied to specific vulnerable patient
groups such as older people and people with intellectual disabilities and a
lack empirical evidence on the effectiveness and effective application.

However, V, Ratti, et al,
2015 submit that “a successful implementation of person -centre planning
requires more than just a change in procedure, it also require a change in attitude,
value, knowledge and competence”

To date there is still no
sufficient evidence to support the notion that person-centre planning, had
achieved, sustained and substantial change in the lives of people with
intellectual disability, as originally anticipated. (V. Ratti et al, 2015)

CONCLUSIONINTRODUCTION

Luckasson et al: AAIDD,2010, referred to intellectual
disability as” mental retardation which was later in 2010 termed as
intellectual disability, and is a disability characterised by significant
limitation both in intellectual functioning and adaptatively behaviour as
expressed in conceptional, social and practical adaptive skill; which originate
before age 18″.

An Bord Attranais/Nursing and Midwifery brand of
Ireland NMBI in 2015, postulated that “the philosophy of care of a person with
an intellectual disability contains a number of implicit principles which
embrace it concept that all people with all levels of ability have the same
right and in so far as possible the same responsibility as other member of
society”.

Understanding of the word intellectual disability and
the philosophy of the care of ID person as stated above by An Bord Attranais.
In their article, Peter Lewis et al 2016, emphasised that “in the UK, people
with ID are 1-6 times more likely to be hospitalised than the general
population”. The hospital staff were said to be lacking the knowledge or skills
in how to care for and communicate with ID people which can lead to higher rate
of preventable readmission to hospital than experienced by the general
population, hence the need for Intellectual Disability Nurses. (Peter Lewis et
al, 2016).

The philosophy of the intellectual disability nursing
programme as written by UCC, 2015 clearly defined
intellectual client participation in the community, the development of socially
valued roles disability nursing as a profession that “strives to improve
client participation in the community, the development of socially valued roles
and increased personal satisfactory and fulfilled inclusive of the family”.

Intellectual disability Nurses are caring, productive,
reflective and analytical healthcare professionals, who will be an integral
member of the interdisciplinary teams drawing on their in-depth specialist
theoretical knowledge and clinical experience. (UCC,2015).

Owen Doody et al, 2017 gave the fact that “many
countries do not have specially trained intellectual disability nurses. Peter
Lewis et al, 2016 affirmed it saying “the only countries offering a unique
specialist qualification in Intellectual Disability Nursing are the UK and Ireland.

In this assignment I will be describing the role of
the intellectual disability nurse in undertaking person centre planning with
people with an intellectual disability.

 

THE ROLE OF THE INTELLECTUAL DISABILITY NURSE

Peter Lewis et al, 2016, emphasised that “Nurses need
to be adequately prepared to care for people with intellectual disability. He
further said the preparation should, “include dealing with the complexities of
communicating with people with intellectual disability and practical experience
of doing so in clinical and educational environment that ensure the safety and
dignity of nurses and people with ID.

The following role of
intellectual disability nurses as required by HSE Dublin mid leister, HSE
Dublin North East, HSE South and HSE West.

·        
Provide holistic, person centred nursing
care, promoting optimum independence, enhancing the quality of life for service
users with intellectual, physical or sensory disability in all aspects of daily
living.

·        
Assess, plan, implement and evaluate
individual service user’s person-centred care programme within an agreed
framework in accordance with best practice and grounded in recent
evidence-based nursing research.

·        
Develop and maintain close links with the
service user, family/guardian, ensuring a partnership approach.

·        
Work closely with the multidisciplinary
team to achieve optimal input for the service user.

·        
Maintain appropriate and accurate written
records and reports regarding service user care in accordance with local and
international guideline.

·        
Foster a philosophy of care that reflects
the HSE and local service commitment to quality, using an evidence-based
approach in a safe environment maintaining the dignity of the service user.

·        
Monitor overall healthcare, prevention of
illness and promote healthy life style with service users.

·        
Promote and maintain nursing standards of
person centre care, including the promotion of normalisation and quality of
life issue.

·        
Encourage service user’s engagement in
community activities and escort and participate in such activities thus
promoting a socially inclusive model of living.

·        
Contribute to, implement, monitor, and
review the development of risk assessment for service users.

(HSE,2012. Campaign reference NRS592)

 

According to Fintain K
Sheerin, 2008, intellectual disability nurse “act as an advocate for service
user and their families and provide information to empower them in decision
making, goal setting and problem solving in order to optimise their
contribution and facilitate their participation in community-based activities”,
affirmed by HSE, 2012, Campaign reference NRS592.

INMO, 2015, identified
the below bullet points as the role of IDN covering across four stages of
life’s;

·        
The key role of IDN begin upon diagnosis,
whether this be earlier or later in a person life and help in linking the key
transition period to each stage of life progressing into the twilight year.

·        
Support client and family to develop their
own solution, overtime, that build on the strength and capabilities of
intellectual disable people.

·        
Liaise with other professionals in the
health service for example maternity and paediatric hospital, primary care and palliative
care service as well as with other agency to priotise the needs of their clients.

·        
Lead out on the provision of
community-based services ensuring families are involved in their service
delivery thus ensuring family centred practice.

·        
Provide support across all environment,
house setting (residential), educational (special school) and community setting
(after school).

·        
Provide training to families in defined
core areas including, Early Bird Plus (autism training), Lamh, challenge
behaviour etc.

 

PERSON CENTRED PLANNING
WITH INTELLECTUAL DISABILITY PEOPLE

It was reported by
Michael et al, 2015 that “the concept of person centred care is strongly linked
to Kitwoods works of 1997 in relation to dementia care, which emphasises a
belief that all people can lead fulfilled lives”

US Military July, 2017 in
EP magazine defined, person- centre planning “as a process which helps
individual with disabilities direct their lives with the involvement of their
families, and now have more options to plan housing, work, finance and more”.

People with intellectual
disability have been experiencing transformation in the way service is been
provided to them, progressively shifting from a system centre approach to a
person-centred approach, tailored around the client, instead of one size fits
all structure. (V.Ratti et al, 2015).

 V.Ratti et al, 2015, explained further that
“person- centre planning is the latest approach aimed at achieving
individualized support for people with intellectual disability and improving
their quality of life.

 Approaches may differ in their practical
application according to the content and purpose for which they are adopted but
the underlying aim is the same and the common denominator between the
variations of person-centre planning is to support people with intellectual
disability to build a lifestyle based on choice, preference, right and
inclusion. (V.Ratti et al,2015)

Person-centre care is
very effective, not only among patient with chronic physical and mental health
condition but also effective in improving both treatment and patient outcome
and is cost effective. (Kwan & Sandercook, 2003).

In contrast, Michael
Brown et al, 2015, identify some barriers in the application of this type of
care such as time, dissolution of professional power, limited autonomy to
practice, limited organisation structure, poor care environment, lack of
understanding of person-centre care as applied to specific vulnerable patient
groups such as older people and people with intellectual disabilities and a
lack empirical evidence on the effectiveness and effective application.

However, V, Ratti, et al,
2015 submit that “a successful implementation of person -centre planning
requires more than just a change in procedure, it also require a change in attitude,
value, knowledge and competence”

To date there is still no
sufficient evidence to support the notion that person-centre planning, had
achieved, sustained and substantial change in the lives of people with
intellectual disability, as originally anticipated. (V. Ratti et al, 2015)

CONCLUSION

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